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5 Questions For Aina Brei’Yon

Aina Brei'Yon

Aina Brei’Yon makes it very clear that boundaries do not apply to her. Early on in her career, she understood the importance of being true to who she is and embracing idealism. Her reality is defined by her beliefs, a message that transcends through her music.

As a “creator of experiences,” her talent of using her music to tell her stories has presented her with several opportunities to open up for acts such as J.Holiday, Talib Kweli, Soulja Boy, and B2K, just to name a few.

“I am a creator. I don’t rap. I don’t sing. I create and raise vibrations. When the world sees you one way, they believe that’s the only way you should be,” Brei’Yon explains. “I can’t be boxed in. When I create, I create from whatever I’m feeling at the moment. No rules. No limitations.”

From writing and performing her profound lyrics to landing relevant roles and appearances in several screenplays and web series, Brei’Yon has become a well-known and self-taught featured independent artist of today.

 

Describe yourself in a six-word sentence.
I’m unique, liberating, creative, and courageous.

 

What was the last thing you shared on social media?
I shared something inspiring and uplifting.

 

What do you think is the main challenge facing the LGBTQ community?
The fact that we’re missing the most important word within the word community, which is unity. We fight and compete against one another and if we don’t have anything solid to stand on within our community, how can we stand on any solid grounds outside of it.

 

What is your favorite LGBTQ business where you live?
I honestly don’t know of any nor do I target a business that’s LGBTQ just because I’m a lesbian. I just like people that run a good business no matter what they do or who they do in their personal lives.

 

What advice do you have for queer people trying to get into the music/entertainment industry?
I would advise them not to stand so strong on a label. If you’re an entertainer, it’s an art, not a sexual preference. Be consistent and trust yourself. Make people respect your art. Labels are a way to identify and separate. We just need to feel you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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