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This Online Social Lesbian Game Is Perfect for Quartinis

Girls Like Girls Social Game

Just when we needed it most, there’s now a game for queer women to be social while social distancing.

The Girls Like Girls Digital Drinking Game can be played on any browser or device, no app involved. When you pay the $6.99 (read to the end for a discount!), you get a unique link that you can send to up to four friends.

Girls Like Girls Game on iPhone

You’ll then see a card in the middle of your screen and everyone has to answer and follow the instructions. The cards are conversation starters and there’s no winning, it’s just a way to have fun. You’ll all be on streaming video and you can use the cards just to have fun, you don’t have to do it as a drinking game (or you can use any beverage you want).

Flown out to meet a girl game card

The friends you play with don’t need to purchase anything to play with you and the link is good for up to ten games.

There are 130 cards in the deck and the app’s creator Annie Leal says many were inspired by her group of friends… and of course her ex-girlfriends. (Probably the same people if the stereotype holds true!) As the game description says, “If you’re vegan, have a cat, or have ever gotten a U-Haul after a second date, this game is for you.” In other words, this game gets us.

sing the l word theme song game card

Leal had been working on the physical card game for a few months and planned a Pride-timed launch before the coronavirus pandemic hit. “I wanted to make something that allowed queer people to come together and celebrate all of the funny jokes, stories and experiences in our community,” she says. After social distancing became encouraged she “couldn’t stop thinking about people in the community that had no other option than to stay home with people who wouldn’t allow them to be fully themselves. It’s not like they could go to gay clubs or meet up with their friends. So, we made the digital version. People can see and hear their friends, and play a game that celebrates them while safely staying at home.”

This is the first game that Leal has ever made, and the response has been “incredible” so far. She’s even getting messages from queer clubs at colleges using it during their remote meetings. “With everything happening in the world right now, I wanted to create something that even though it’s silly it would still allow people to come together and have a safe space to laugh and be themselves. A little distraction from everything happening. And to be honest, creating this and seeing how people are using it has given me some purpose during these weird times.”

At a time when we’re missing our friends, and some are home with families who don’t accept or understand them, Leal sees this game as more important than ever. “I used to work for a Latinx company (I was born and raised in Mexico) and saw how powerful it can be when a community feels represented and seen. I wanted to bring that same feeling to the other part of my identity which is queer.”

This is not a sponsored post, but when Tagg reached out to Leal for comment, she wanted to give Tagg readers a little gift. Enter the code TAGGMAGAZINE at checkout for a $2 discount! Code expires April 20, 2020. Have fun!

 

 

Sarah Prager
Sarah Prager
Sarah Prager is a writer living in Massachusetts with her wife and their two children. She is the author of the award-winning Queer, There, and Everywhere: 23 People Who Changed the World and the forthcoming Rainbow Revolutionaries: 50 LGBTQ People Who Made History. Her writing has also appeared in The Atlantic, HuffPost, Bustle, JSTOR Daily, and GO Magazine, among others. www.sarahprager.com.