Events for November 2022

Micaela Kaibni Raen and Dee Norwood
Shoestrings, Bubble Gum and the Gay Mom’s Club
July 23, 2013
Emily Hecht McGowan
National LGBT Bar Association Recognizes Best LGBT Lawyers Under 40
July 25, 2013

Our Lesbian Obsession with the SuicideGirls

SuicideGirls

Who the SGs are and why we love them

 

By Katy Ray

Founder of SuicideGirls

Women are beautiful. Every lesbian identifies with this simple yet powerful statement; however, the women’s community is in need of a safe haven from the exclusive blonde-haired, blue-eyed American standard of beauty, and that’s exactly what we find in the SuicideGirls phenomenon.

Through her nationally acclaimed and world-renowned web site SuicideGirls Founder, Missy Suicide offers us yet another definition of beauty, and the lesbian community is taking notice.

“SuicideGirls is an alternative to the mainstream media’s obsession with the silicone enhanced Barbie Dolls and the incredible shrinking starlets,” explains Missy. “I want to show the world that beauty and intelligence are not mutually exclusive.”

These tattooed, pierced, and undeniably beautiful models that represent varying ethnicities, body types, and sexualities, do exactly that. So what is it about these women that have the lesbian community in such a trance.

“I think SuicideGirls celebrates the female form as being beautiful and fosters a culture of pride in your body that resonates with the lesbian audience,” she says.

Missy, who first founded the SuicideGirls website in 2001, has now transformed the web site to include over 2,500 models from across the globe.

Among these is out model Zoli Suicide, age 26, who first began modeling for the web site because she wanted to let women know that “you can be beautiful and sexy and not be perfect” according to mainstream media’s standards. Zoli first embraced her sexuality at age 17, and began her modeling career shortly after in 2006.

“I think it is important to be out in order to empower and encourage women to be themselves and to not be ashamed of who they are,” she explains. Her profile currently reads “interested in women,” and her fan base is generally accepting of this description.

Zoli Suicide

Zoli of SuicideGirls

“Every once in a while someone has a comment or opinion about it, but I never respond or engage. Some men are bummed when they realize their fantasy would never come true.” And can you blame them?

For many models in the fashion industry, coming out could prove a risky business move, but one Zoli was willing to take.

“I have never regretted being myself and being true to myself. When I am being me, I feel my best even when others might have negative opinions about it,” she explains.

All members of the SuicideGirls team, including models, photographers, and owners, have been extremely supportive and accepting of her sexuality, setting a high industry standard that we can only hope will one day be the model industry norm.

When asked how she and the SuicideGirls web site acquired such a vast lesbian following, she says, “What’s not to love about beautiful women?”

These women are breaching the bounds of beauty and supplying the lesbian community with exactly what we are hungry for: women who are as wonderfully diverse and complex as we are.

Perhaps this is the reason the SuicideGirl phenomenon has grown exponentially over the past 10 years, boasting three published books of pin-up photos, four movie airings on Showtime, and cameos on national programs such as CSI, MTV, the E! Network.

“The brand has grown to mean so much more to people than just a web site,” explains Missy. “SuicideGirls is about confidence. I receive e-mails from girls every day that didn’t feel confident before finding out about SuicideGirls.”

Since being introduced to SuicideGirls, these women and their confidence in themselves has boosted, and in turn, boosts others. This is the SuicideGirls effect.

“These are real girls with real personalities and real bodies inspiring other real girls,” Missy affirms.

When asked how she plans to continue to engage the lesbian audience in her endeavor, Missy responds: “We plan to continue doing what we have always, featuring real girls, in beautiful pictures, being confident and comfortable with their bodies and themselves.”

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Ebone Bell
Eboné Bell
Eboné is the Editor-in-Chief of Tagg Magazine. She is the illegitimate child of Oprah and Ellen...so it's only right that she continues their legacy in the media world.