SisterSpace: An Exciting Community of Women

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SisterSpace: An Exciting Community of Women

An interview with Geri Mars

Sisterspace Weekend Entertainers

 

SisterSpace is celebrating its 38th anniversary as a weekend full of parties, entertainment, recreation, educational activities, and more. Held September 5-7, 2014, at a rural campground in Maryland, SisterSpace will be the a great place to flirt and have fun. While it focuses on activities for lesbian and bi-sexual women, all women are welcome to attend.

The first SisterSpace women’s weekend was held in 1977 and was called the Lesbian Feminist Weekend. True to its roots, many participants find it empowering to have a space that is female-lead, multi-generational and women-centered. The SisterSpace weekend brings musical performers from all over the country. More than a music festival, the weekend is packed full of activities, entertainment, and multiple venues to meet other women with similar interests. Geri Mars began participating with SisterSpace in the 80s and has been an integral part to the annual women’s festival.

Tagg Magazine: What drew you to get involved with the female-centric community in the early 80s?
Mars: As a kid, I had life-changing experiences at Girl Scout camp every summer. In the early 80s, I was newly “out” and the idea of camping, music, and women in the woods was a very familiar and comforting concept to me. I’ve always been drawn to communities of women.

Geri Mars of SisterSpace

Geri Mars

TM: What was most inspiring about your experience with SisterSpace?
Mars: Working in collaboration with a diverse group of incredibly dedicated women to create this community is both inspiring and empowering. There have been many, many lifelong friendships and partnerships created at SisterSpace!

TM: What organizations are currently working in partnership with the SisterSpace community?
Mars: SisterSpace is always interested in partnering with like-minded organizations and individuals. We try to raise awareness of what’s going on in our community through entertainment, vendors, workshops, activities and discussions. We welcome sponsors and anyone else who would be interested in partnering with us. SisterSpace also sponsors or contributes to other organizations and events throughout the year.

TM: How is the SisterSpace organization using social media to create community
Mars: We have a SisterSpace Weekend Facebook page. Friend us! This is an important online forum for women interested in SisterSpace. SisterSpace is an all-volunteer organization and there are many volunteer opportunities: join the Board, become a weekend planner or area coordinator, take on planning an event that we haven’t even thought of yet. SisterSpace’s evolution reflects the energy and ideas of the women who are actively involved. If there’s anyone out there who is excited by the idea of shaping and contributing to an organization dedicated to creating safe space for women, we’d like to hear from you. You can follow us on Twitter at SSODV.

TM: SisterSpace has been an important part in the lives of many women. What is the legacy that SisterSpace will take into the future
Mars: We are approaching our 40th weekend. This is truly a milestone in the sphere of women’s festivals. Our longevity speaks to the desire that women have for a safe, diverse, inclusive, entertaining, and educational space created by women. SisterSpace’s future evolution will be determined by the women who step-up to usher it into its 50th decade. Our legacy is the scores of women who have attended the weekend and have contributed or benefitted from being in this unique community of women.

To register for the festival or for more information about the SisterSpace community, go to www.sisterspace.org.

 

Micaela Kaibni Raen is an Arab-American author whose work explores cultural, socio-economic and sexual themes that critically impact women and their families.

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